Looking towards San Francisco from the Steep Ravine camping area at Mt. Tamalpais State Park.

The mighty Pacific.


Left: The fresh walking trail of a California quail in mud at the Steep Ravine campground. How many other tracks can you spot? Right: Closeup of a California quail track. Quail have what is known as “game bird” foot structure. Their feet are anisodactyl (three toes pointing forward, one pointing back), but the back toe (hallux) is greatly reduced.

White-crowned sparrow tracks near a perfect puddle for bird bathing.


Left: The fresh trail of a striped skunk walking through the mud at Steep Ravine. Right: The older trail of a California newt walking through the mud at Steep Ravine. Notice the beautiful tail drag through the center of the trail.

A huge mushroom near my sit spot. We speculate it’s either a Bay Bolete or King Bolete. More investigation (and information) is forthcoming!

The beautiful impression of a fresh deer lay in wet grass near my sit spot.


Left: The WE Immersion spent a day tracking the landscape at Bodega Dunes. Here, participants discuss aspects of a walking deer trail. Right: During the tracking day, WE staff held tracking stations and asked questions similar to the way CyberTracker evaluations are conducted. One of the questions for this scat was: “Based on the visible evidence in this scat, what species (common name) was eaten?” Scroll down to the end of the post for the answer!

It’s hard to see in this picture, but we were graced by a double-double rainbow during our tracking at Bodega Dunes. EPIC.

Moon. Fog. Silhouette. Magick.

Question: “Based on the visible evidence in this scat, what species (common name) was eaten?” Answer: American coot! They have way cool (and distinct) feet. Look it up!